Saturday, November 10, 2007


This is a small 5x7 invented composition on hot press watercolor paper with a transparent watercolor wash base followed with opaque gouache on top. I was thinking about how the Dutch painters in the 17th century would invent Italian landscapes from their studios in Holland. I am exploring here a romantic landscape, perhaps in Spain or early California before the giant oaks dissapeared. When you look at Ruisdael you never see sawed off limbs from standing tress but rather pure forms with twisted, broken branches in various states of decay. All very interesting areas to get lost into. In addition, I find the lone figure or small groupings in the landscape classical and timeless.

9 comments:

Jared Shear said...

Spectacular piece....romantic and powerful. Perhaps that strength comes from those old strong looking oaks that stand like ancient guards of the landscape. Love those deep blues of the sky as well.

Albert Ramos said...

Beautiful pices you have here man. This one reminds me my homeland (Spain).

I see that you like Spanish masters aswell.

Thanks for sharing!

Izzy Medrano said...

Brilliant! The key is so dark and majestic. Did you start with a very saturated watercolor underpainting? How'd you pull those lovely clouds out of that? Just fantastic!

Artguff said...

Brilliant!

salamander said...

I can get lost in this painting for hours!

michael mikolon said...

Poetic!!!!!!!
I look forward to your postings

Jim Feldman said...

Interesting you mention the absence of sawed-off limbs in Ruisdael. I read somewhere that the occasional sawed-off tree stump in Renaissance and Baroque painting is a symbol for the Resurrection - and sure enough after I read that I began to notice it's always a tree stump *with a sprig of new growth*. Enjoy looking at your sketches, thanks for posting them.

Martin said...

The good old tricks still can do it :). I share the interest in the historical roots of landscape depiction,because that´s where we all come from in landscape painting. If you haven´t read it yet (most likely) I would suggest a book titled "landscape and power"

addon said...

Super work, majestic and powerful. A wonderful picture to explore. Makes me want to dump my photography and take up some painting again!