Saturday, May 29, 2010


Getting close to finishing the mini ebook tutorial, thanks for your patience! Here is a recent value study for a stormy cliff composition. Perhaps a French sailing barge grounded with crew looking on, dwarfed by the scale of the crumbling precipice above.

Gouache on gray canson paper, dip pen loaded with diluted watercolor and gouache, touches of pastel pencil. 6x10 inches.

24 comments:

Anonymous said...

stunning as usual!
Can't wait for the tutorial, I learned so much from your Gnomon DVD!
Cheers and thanks for sharing your knowledge
u.

DSM said...

That's it! I'm getting out my dusty gouaches today!
Thanks always for your posts.

sebbonaparte said...

Great stuff, I can't wait for your ebook, I will definitely buy it.

Garrett Hanna said...

Wow this is amazing!

Jared Shear said...

Very nice Erik. Looking forward to the e-book. The dip pen technique sounds interesting.

Shane Pierce said...

whoa! awesome man - that hit of light is just beautiful!

Mathew Mossman said...

Wohoo another Gouache artist! Your brush strokes are so liberating, great paintings.

Anonymous said...

I love your work, please do more PDF
for us, greetings from Argentina!

Florian Jouet said...

impressive! waw waw waw
i feel the nervousness

abhishek singh said...

you are just INCREDIBLE!
i've just started exploring gouache,
your blog is of tremendous help:)

SKIZO said...

Sublime
Work

good
sources
of
Inspiration

seanmaximus said...

i'm blown away:-O

Rob Carey said...

Powerful composition and attitude here. Love it.

Per Elof Nilsson Ricklund said...

Impressive landscape, the feeling of the foam hitting the rocks is effectful.
Glad that you're sharing your work hear, reallys like what you're doing with your gouach landscpaes, and the dramatic sense of light you capture in your landscapes. Hope you're having a great vecation at that you'll be back with more work in short.

Makes me want to get out and studie the landscapes nature's given.

Anonymous said...

I have been using acrylics for years, but I have always been intrigued by washes. Years ago I played with those big fat bamboo brushes and ink wash. I never experimented with watercolor because I felt that using it properly and not mudding the transparency was what true water color excellence was all about. It seems that these tutorials shed some light on the proper application of wash and watercolor . It absolves the transparency problems. Those landscapes are gorgeous art. Very nice artistic applications; you have an eye for transporting the majesty of landscape to a teaching scenario. Art is a glorious escape, thanks for helping us art hobbyists who are still in the novice stage to get a step closer to true profes-sionalism. I intend to re-immerse myself in art when I retire. I never thought that teaching sites like yours existed till I found it quite by accident. Keep up the lessons, this is so much easier that packing my paints, canvases, sketch pads and myself off to a class that requires miles of driving time.

Harris Hammersmith said...

Very powerful.

Richard Smitheman said...

Amazing!

Mariusz Kornatka said...

A masterpiece!

All the best,
Mariusz

http://www.mariuszkornatka.posterous.com

HiFi said...

Very nice lighting at the bottom where the rocks are. Really cool

iz said...

I have just discovered your fabulous site!
Do you treat the gray Canson paper in anyway when you use diluted watercolour and gouache? Mine always buckles and I don't use that much water?

I am looking forward to your mini ebook tutorial but wonder if I can order it here or how do I go about paying for and downloading?
Thanks,Iz

E.Tiemens said...

Hi Iz,

Regarding Canson paper, I usually cut the paper down small and the buckles are not too bad. It's not the best support large, unless you mount it to some illustration board.

As for the ebook, I will like to release that on my blog or website (www.watersketch.com) and have it for sale as a download via paypal by the end of February 2011.

-Erik

bvjittison said...

I wonder what size this study is. The subject is monumental and it seems to be a very large painting, but I suspect it is around 8x10?

bvjittison said...

Erik, it's amazing that you can portray a monumental scene in such a small space as 6x10! I really love the limited palette you chose for this painting. Respect, Jim

Anonymous said...

Hi Erik,
Could you please post an update to the availability of your ebook tutorial? Love your work and methods.

John
Baton Rouge, Louisiana