Thursday, June 16, 2011


A small format oil on panel study inspired by the works of Jacob van Ruisdael, 1628-1682, supreme master of dutch landscape. In this case using cold press linseed oil as a medium and walnut oil as a brush cleaner, no turps for me!

9 comments:

Daniel Ljunggren said...

Wow. Balance and weight distribution is great!

Walter L. Mosley said...

Beautiful!

margplum said...

Saffola oil also works really well, washes out with soap and water, and keeps your brushes happy.
How small is small? is this a little 4x5?
I'm seeing sap green, yellow ochre, ultramarine, ands mayhaps burnt sienna? I really love how you use blues.

Koen Ivens said...

Beautiful work! I'm not an expert in oil-painting but: doesn't it take a lifetime for the painting to get dry or do you use something to speed the drying?

Keul said...

Beautiful as usual... I love the light you put on a particular part of the ground, it gives a lot of emotion to the hole painting.
Does walnut oil work as well as turps to wash the brushes? as i work at home it would change my life!

Shane Pierce said...

love it man! Your brushwork is always the best

bvjittison said...

I see characteristics of "The Great Oak" 1652 by Ruisdael. I like rhythm and flow of movement in your version better. There is more harmony in the symphony of shapes. You have infused your painting with more energy.

Adam said...

This is fantastic. Love it. Makes me want to study old Dutch paintings more. I feel like it's my heritage or something.

E.Tiemens said...

Thank you everyone for the kind comments! Bvjittison, that was over the top, I'm always humbled by Ruisdael. I just saw one of his oak grove drawings at Boston's BFA, breathtaking use of gray wash over black chalk(crayon). The energy of the drawings almost is more interesting than the paintings. Also the liberal use of staffage figure painters hints at the market of these landscapes at the time and the amount of specialization each genre artist focused on.

-Erik